"One of the biggest evolutions in field training is that the program molds to the student as adults learn in different ways," says Dan Greene, the executive director of the National Association of Field Training Officers (NAFTO). As a former FTO and FTO supervisor, Dan knows what FTOs need to become better trainers and educators. At the recent NAFTO conference in Louisville, Kentucky, Policing Matters host Jim Dudley spoke with Dan about the evolution of FTO training in law enforcement.

This episode of the Policing Matters Podcast is sponsored by the Master of Science in Law Enforcement & Public Safety Leadership Program at the University of San Diego. Learn how this nationally ranked online program can help you be a force for change at sandiego.edu/police1.

Police officers are often terrific storytellers. Many express an interest in writing a book about their experiences, but life can get in the way and few cops sit down to begin the process.

This isn't the case for a guest on this episode of Policing Matters. Jim Calams, a retired member of the Phoenix Police Department and LAPD, recently published “Unwavering Honor,” a book about his career in those departments and also about personal tragedy. He is joined by his daughter, Sarah Calams, who graduated with a bachelor's degree in news/editorial journalism from the University of North Texas in Denton, Texas, and is the senior associate editor of Police1.com and Corrections1.com. Sarah recently authored an article about her father's experiences as a police officer.

Law enforcement officers are exposed to more tragedy and trauma than the general population. What impact does this have on the mental well-being of cops?
 
In this episode of Policing Matters, host Jim Dudley speaks with Chief Joel Shults, who operates Street Smart Training and is the founder of the National Center for Police Advocacy, about some of the complex issues around officer PTSD and resiliency. Contact Joel Shults here.

Catalytic converter thefts have soared in recent years, thanks largely to the spiking prices of precious metals contained within them. This sudden rise has created an urgent need for police to find ways to deter thefts.

To help law enforcement agencies address the crisis, CARFAX for Police compiled a Catalytic Converter Replacement Report that identifies the most-targeted vehicles nationally, regionally and by state. In addition to the report, CARFAX for Police is hosting a free digital event for law enforcement on Tuesday, June 7 at 1 p.m. ET on Investigating Trends: Catalytic Converter Theft.

In this episode of Policing Matters, host Jim Dudley speaks with veteran police officers Lt. Michael Ledoux (Ret.), director of business development at CARFAX for Police and IACP Vehicle Crimes Committee member, and Sr. Trooper Robert Ivey, a criminal investigator with the Bureau of Criminal Investigations and Intelligence, Florida Highlight Patrol, about their experiences investigating catalytic converter thefts.

This episode of the Policing Matters Podcast is sponsored by the Master of Science in Law Enforcement & Public Safety Leadership Program at the University of San Diego. Learn how this nationally ranked online program can help you be a force for change at sandiego.edu/police1.

Following the tragic school shooting at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut on December 14, 2012, Troy Anderson managed the Connecticut State Police CISM teams that were deployed on-site and tasked with providing interventions and debriefings for the affected members of the State Police, municipal and federal law enforcement partners, first responder staff, support personnel, embedded clinicians, and state senior executives.

In this episode of Policing Matters, Troy speaks with podcast host Jim Dudley about the key lessons learned from the critical incident stress management and peer support process following the Sandy Hook shooting, plus recommendations for how agencies can implement effective peer support ahead of a critical incident. Troy currently serves as the executive director of officer safety and wellness for the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund (NLEOMF).

Many of the technologies we have seen in movies about law enforcement in the future are now part of everyday life. "Westworld" featured autonomous cars, while individually focused branding and advertising featured in "Minority Report." In "Blade Runner," retinal scans are used as a means of interview and interrogation.
 
As life sometimes imitates art, we now have EyeDetect from Converus, an eye scanning device used much the same way that a polygraph measures physical responses during an interview or interrogation.
 
In this episode of Policing Matters, host Jim Dudley speaks with Converus President and CEO Todd Mickelsen about the possible applications of EyeDetect in law enforcement. Over the years, Todd has demonstrated EyeDetect to the CIA, FBI, U.S. State Department, Secret Service, Department of Defense, National Security Agency, Department of Homeland Security, and others. 

Digital forensics has been a specialty science in law enforcement for several years now, with emerging technology and investigative revelations happening every year. The science behind digital evidence recovery, be it from a cell phone, computer or even the cloud, takes a skilled investigator who knows what they are doing.

In this episode of Policing Matters, host Jim Dudley speaks with Deputy Director Caroline Torie of the St. Joseph County Cyber Crimes Unit in Indiana. Caroline started her career as a law enforcement officer in September 2021 after five years as a television reporter for WSBT-TV, a CBS affiliate in Indiana. She covered police investigations as a journalist but wanted to do more to impact the pursuit of truth and justice in her community and so she started working in law enforcement herself. Now, she’s the recipient of a Magnet Forensics Scholarship Award that will allow her to train for a year under digital forensic experts.

This episode of the Policing Matters Podcast is brought to you by Lexipol, the experts in policy, training, wellness support and grants assistance for first responders and government leaders. To learn more, visit lexipol.com.

Managing police officers is a difficult task since the job is so multi-faceted and often fast-paced. We ask officers to do so many things, and in the process to be smart, thoughtful, judicious, efficient and thorough.

Some people make assumptions that an officer has complete control over their environment. Of course, this is not true. Officers can be well trained, yet may be challenged in dealing with individuals under the influence of alcohol, drugs, or in a mental health crisis. They are often asked to go into situations where people are in conflict or combative. In these cases, de-escalation may only be a theory, rather than an achievable act.

Many agencies use a system to help detect problems by looking at statistics accumulated in an early intervention system. In this episode of Policing Matters, host Jim Dudley speaks with Chief Robert McNeilly, Jr., about how an early intervention system can work best for agencies, officers and communities.

During Chief McNeilly's 37-year career, he guided the Pittsburgh Bureau of Police through 10 of its most turbulent years, taking office one week after a series of lawsuits filed against the city by individuals and the ACLU led to a U.S. Department of Justice investigation and the first civil-rights “pattern or practice” consent decree in American history. He is the author of "Blue Continuum: A Police Chief’s Perspective on What’s Wrong with Policing Today and How to Fix It," and a leading trainer and consultant in police management techniques.

Since the D.C. Council voted in 2020 to cut the police budget by $15 million, there has been a 28% increase in violent crime, a 55% increase in robberies, an 18% increase in carjackings and, as of 2021, the highest number of homicides in nearly two decades. On April 15, 2022, Salah Czapary published an op-ed in The Washington Post titled "No one asked for fewer DC police doing more work." Salah is a Democrat, a candidate for his party's nomination for D.C. Council Ward 1, a former D.C. police officer and special assistant to the Chief of Police.

In this episode of Policing Matters, host Jim Dudley speaks with Salah about the challenges facing the Metropolitan Police Department and real-world initiatives that would improve community safety. To learn more about Salah, visit https://salah2022.com/.

This episode of the Policing Matters Podcast is brought to you by Lexipol, the experts in policy, training, wellness support and grants assistance for first responders and government leaders. To learn more, visit lexipol.com.

We are at a crossroads in policing. What are the long-term effects on law enforcement of defunding, COVID-19, the recruitment crisis, and public perception? What about AI? Technology? Less lethal weapons? How do all these things impact officer safety and morale? Wouldn’t it be great to get a glimpse into the future to give assurance to our veteran officers and their families to stay the course and to let new candidates know policing is still a noble profession worth entering?

Today’s guest on Policing Matters is Scott A. Cunningham, a 38-year police professional with 12 years as a chief of police. He holds a Ph.D. in Adult Education and Organizational Management; teaches police officers, students, citizens, and communities on numerous topics; and is a team leader for CALEA. Scott recently authored, “The Future of Policing: 200 Recommendations to Enhance Policing and Community Safety,” and shares his top recommendations during a conversation with podcast host Jim Dudley.

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